Behavior modification

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Question:

I am a fifth grade teacher and I am looking for help in developing some individual behavior plans for three children in my room. One child in particular has many difficulties interacting with the other children in a positive manner. He often uses inappropriate language and can act out physically. He frequently shouts out things in class and is inconsiderate to others. He has problems where ever he goes and has been suspended for smoking on the playground.He is a nice child one on one, and will respond passively when spoken to. He just can't seem to actually behave the way he tells you he will. Any help would be appreciated. I would like to try and help this child and desperately need to develop a plan.

Thank You

Jnean

 

Answer:

Dear Jnean,

I appreciate your attitude and desire to help the kids in your class who are having difficulty. I believe the best way to help all students, including discouraged students (a misbehaving child is a discouraged child) is through class meetings. Our book Positive Discipline in the Classroom gives details on how to teach students the Eight Building Blocks for Effective Class Meetings. In the class meeting process students learn to help each other and to look for non-punitive solutions to problems. Students learn to give and receive compliments. They learn many of the important life skills that will serve them well in all areas of their adult lives (marriage, work, friendships) as well as helping them feel encouraged through the process of experiencing a sense of belonging and significance. Many teachers have told me that one of their favorite fringe benefits from class meetings (besides the fringe benefit of eliminating most discipline problems) is the improvement they see in "problem" students. I would love to see you at one of our two-day workshops on Positive Discipline in the Classroom. The workshop is now available as a DVD or Online Training. Also, the Positive Discipline: A Teacher's A-Z Guide book where we discuss 102 specific problem situations in detail. You might also enjoy reading the article on "School Code" for an example from the book and class meetings.

Best wishes,

Jane Nelsen